“It’s supposed to be hard. If it wasn’t hard, everyone would do it. The hard… is what makes it great.”
— Jimmy Dugan (Tom Hanks, A League of Their Own)
“Like every beginner, I have thought you could beat, pummel and thrash an idea into existence. Under such treatment, of course, any decent idea folds up its paws, turns on its back, fixes its eyes on eternity, and dies.”
— Ray Bradbury
“Your mind will answer most questions if you learn to relax and wait for the answer.”
— William S. Burroughs
“A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.”
— Winston Churchill
“An intimate relationship is one in which neither party silences, sacrifices, or betrays the self and each party expresses strength and vulnerability, weakness and competence in a balanced way.”
— Harriet Lerner
“It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.”
— Albert Einstein

Oh Yes

there are worse things than
being alone
but it often takes decades
to realize this
and most often
when you do
it’s too late
and there’s nothing worse
than
too late.

— Charles Bukowski

Studying the humanities should be like standing among colleagues and students on the open deck of a ship moving along the endless coastline of human experience. Instead, now it feels as though people have retreated to tiny cabins in the bowels of the ship, from which they peep out on a small fragment of what may be a coastline or a fog bank or the back of a spouting whale.

There is a certain literal-mindedness in the recent shift away from the humanities. It suggests a number of things. One, the rush to make education pay off presupposes that only the most immediately applicable skills are worth acquiring (though that doesn’t explain the current popularity of political science). Two, the humanities often do a bad job of explaining why the humanities matter. And three, the humanities often do a bad job of teaching the humanities. You don’t have to choose only one of these explanations. All three apply.

What many undergraduates do not know — and what so many of their professors have been unable to tell them — is how valuable the most fundamental gift of the humanities will turn out to be. That gift is clear thinking, clear writing and a lifelong engagement with literature.

In this eloquent New York Times op-ed, Verlyn Klinkenborg, author of the indispensable Several Short Sentences About Writing, responds to the recent landmark report on the value of the humanities

Pair with this timeless 1939 essay on the usefulness of useless knowledge

(via explore-blog)

(via explore-blog)

Thought for the day

gradnessmadness:

“Life is without meaning. You bring the meaning to it. The meaning of life is whatever you ascribe it to be. Being alive is the meaning.”

- Joseph Campbell